Social Issues

Why weren’t we as angry and vocal with the death of Abdisamad Sheikh-Hussein

Why weren’t we as angry and vocal with the death of Abdisamad Sheikh-Hussein

A young American Somali Muslim boy who led prayers at his local Mosque was hit by a car and ran over by a hateful murderer. His name was Abdisamad Sheikh-Hussein. He died because he was a Muslim. He was fifteen years old and was the son of an assistant Imam at the Islamic Society of Greater Kansas City. When he died he was leaving the mosque. This happened in December 2014, yet we were not as outraged as we were with the recent tragic deaths in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Why is that? More

The Suleman Maknojioa’s of our communities need to be called out and shunned!

The Suleman Maknojioa’s of our communities need to be called out and shunned!

I just read a very disturbing article about a “hafiz” by the name of Suleman Maknojioa who was sexually abusing a young student while teaching them the Qur’an. Can you believe this?! How can someone teach the word of Allah, the speech of Allah, the message from Allah and commit this atrocious crime against a young innocent child. What is shocking is that the UK’s court system has freed this man because he is the main provider for his family. What is even more shocking is the lack of uproar! We don’t like cartoons, videos, or even bad jokes, but for this we haven’t been as vocal against it as we can be. More

While Many Were Talking About Abu Eesa This Was Happening

While Many Were Talking About Abu Eesa This Was Happening

Shaykh Abdullah bin Bayyah invited over 250 Muslim scholars and leaders from around the world for a meeting entitled “Promoting Peace in Muslim Societies” in Abu Dhabi. There were scholars from all different backgrounds: sunni, shia, salafi, sufi, etc. They came from all different parts of the world from Morocco to Afghanistan, from Indonesia to Saudi Arabia. Ed Husain wrote a good piece about it here:
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British singer, Ellie Goulding, releases Song for Syrian Children

It’s rare to find celebrities doing something about tragic events occurring in some parts of the Muslim world due to it’s complexities. I applaud and thank musical artist Ellie Goulding for making this song for the children of Syria in trying to raise funds through the Save the Children UK charity organization. This will shed light to a depressing and tragic event unfolding in Syria to a wider audience.

You can donate by buying the song on iTunes here or this link here.

Head of Saudi Religious Police: “Islamic sharia does not have a text forbidding women driving”

Head of Saudi Religious Police: “Islamic sharia does not have a text forbidding women driving”

RIYADH (Reuters) – Saudi Arabia’s ban on women driving is not mandated by any text in Sharia, the Islamic legal code which forms the basis for most Saudi law, the head of its morality police told Reuters on Thursday.
Sheikh Abdulatif Al al-Sheikh stressed that he has no authority to change Saudi policy on women driving, but his comment may feed into a national discussion in Saudi Arabia, where women have in the past been arrested for defying the ban.
Although Saudi Arabia has no written legal code to go with the texts making up sharia, its police and judiciary have long enforced a prohibition on women driving, citing the country’s conservative customs.
Even without any specific law against women driving, women who defied the prohibition have been arrested by the country’s regular police department and put on trial on charges that include causing public disturbance.
“Islamic sharia does not have a text forbidding women driving,” said Al al-Sheikh, who was appointed by King Abdullah last year to head the Commission for the Promotion of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice, the formal name of the religious police.
King Abdullah has pushed for cautious social and economic reforms in the world’s top oil exporter, including efforts to give women a more prominent role in society.
Al al-Sheikh said that in his role as head of the morality police, he did not make policy but implemented the rules and laws of the kingdom.
He said that the morality police had not pursued or stopped any women for driving since he was made head of the organisation and said he was not aware of such cases before his appointment.
But he added that a report in the Arabic daily al-Hayat on Thursday that members of the morality police had recently been instructed not to pursue or stop women drivers in future was untrue.
“We have not given any new instructions,” he said.
Saudi Arabia’s morality police was set up as an informal institution in the 1930s to enforce public morals according to the strict interpretation of sharia in the kingdom’s official Wahhabi school of Sunni Islam.
It is now a branch of the state, with a permanent staff and annual budget. Al al-Sheikh, like its previous heads, is a religious scholar.
King Abdullah’s reform efforts, such as appointing women to the advisory Shoura Council and promoting female employment, have sometimes incurred opposition among conservatives in the country’s powerful Wahhabi clergy.
“The era of King Abdullah is an era of reform and development of all state organisations, including the Commission,” said Al al-Sheikh.
Al al-Sheikh said he has worked to improve the body’s image over the past 18 months by clamping down on members who exceed their authority and encouraging a lighter hand in its dealing with the public.
“We implement the rules strictly if the Commission people exceed their powers. We don’t allow them to interpret the law themselves,” he said.
Women’s rights groups in the conservative Islamic kingdom have been agitating for a change in the rules. In addition to being banned from driving, Saudi women must seek the approval of a male relative, known as their “guardian”, to travel, get a job, open a bank account or have some forms of elective surgery.
(Reporting by Angus McDowall; Editing by William Maclean and Sonya Hepinstall)

Source: Reuters

We’ve Seen Ta’leef Collective, now meet “MakeSpace”

We’ve seen the work of Ta’leef Collective in creating an inclusive place for Muslims, well now meet MakeSpace. This is a group of Muslims in the DC Metro area trying to create a center where Muslims can come and grow without the barrier of entries in other places.

The mission of MakeSpace is to serve as an inclusive, responsive and transparently-managed hub for the Washington Metropolitan area Muslim community, with a strong focus on youth and professionals, to grow spiritually, intellectually and professionally and to develop an American Muslim identity rooted in the values of balance and compassion through educational programs, civic engagement initiatives, community service projects and recreational activities with the aim of making the timeless message of Islam relevant to the lives of all community members.

Study: Happy people are busy and don’t watch much TV, depressed people are rushed, have free time and watch a lot of TV

Study: Happy people are busy and don’t watch much TV, depressed people are rushed, have free time and watch a lot of TV

University of Maryland Sociologist, John P. Robinson, conducted a study for over 40 years measuring the happiness of people based on time.  The results were fascinating.  He found that people who felt rushed were not happy. The happiest people never feel rush and they don’t have any free time. Those who have free time are unhappy.  He also found that those who watch a lot of TV are also unhappy.

This is very interesting because one would expect those who have free time would be happy, but it was the actual opposite.  This makes sense because happy people always have something to do and had a schedule but also were not rushed.  They had structure.  Whereas those who were depressed and not happy felt rushed, had free time, and watched more TV. The conclusion from the radio interview by John P. Robinson was “Don’t hurry, be happy.”

Source: WAMU Radio Interview

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